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Bringing Graphic Novels into a School's Curriculum

Type: All Ages
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Description

 

Many young adults enjoy graphic novels because the
genre differss o dramaticallyfr om the books that
educators traditionally have encouraged adolescents to
read. Growing up with television and video games,
contemporary young adults look for print media that
contain the same visual impact and pared-down writing
style and contribute to their enthusiasm for visual rather
than written literacy. For many young adults, graphic
novels represent a welcome move away from what they
consider traditional "school" reading. This enthusiasm is
reflected in the increase in sales of graphic novels from
$75 million in 2001 to $120 million in 2003 (Raiteri
2003). To help educators adjust to this new reality, this
article looks at the various types of graphic novels, the
reasons for using them, the characteristics of quality
graphic novels, and suggestions for using in middle and secondary classrooms.
 
Bringing Graphic Novels into a School's Curriculum
Author(s): Katherine T. Bucher and M. Lee ManningReviewed work(s):Source: The Clearing House, Vol. 78, No. 2 (Nov. - Dec., 2004), pp. 67-72Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30197687 .

 

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